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When it comes to landscaping your home or business, it only takes a seed of an idea to begin something special. At Mr. Topsoil, we specialize in helping that dream grow into reality with unmatched landscaping supplies like mulch, topsoil, and sod.

As trusted landscaping suppliers in Charleston, we know how important it is to have quality materials to reflect the beauty and style that you're looking to achieve. Unlike big-box stores, Mr. Topsoil offers attention to detail and stellar customer service that you just won't find anywhere else. There's a simple reason we've been in business for 34 years, and it's because we offer quality products and the best customer service in Charleston. At the end of the day, we do right by our customers by offering them reliable deliveries and honest pricing. That's just the Mr. Topsoil way.

As locals who are born and raised in Charleston, SC, we have a deep appreciation and comprehensive understanding of Lowcountry landscaping. Whether you're a business owner or a homeowner, Mr. Topsoil is your natural choice for landscaping materials.

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Here are just a few reasons why customers consider us the best instead of the rest:

Impeccable Service

Impeccable Service - If you already know what landscaping materials you need to begin your project, let us know. We make life easy by delivering your topsoil, mulch, or sod right to your front door. If you're not quite sure, our dedicated team of professionals is here to help guide you.

Reliable Delivery

Reliable Delivery - Part Mr. Topsoil's commitment is to provide dependable delivery of your landscaping materials. Time and safety are big concerns when dealing with landscaping, especially when dealing with large quantities of materials. That's why Mr. Topsoil uses a fleet of delivery trucks and drivers to cater to your needs. Curious whether we deliver to your home or business? Contact our office today to find out!

Highly-Trained Staff

Highly-Trained Staff - At Mr. Topsoil, our landscaping experts have been around the block once or twice. There is no substitute for real-deal knowledge of landscaping, and our team has got it in spades. We're here to make your landscaping project easy and feasible, and we're here to assist with advice and best practices whenever we are able.

If you're ready to transform your yard or storefront into an outdoor oasis, look no further than Mr. Topsoil in Charleston, SC.

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The Premier Topsoil Supplier in Charleston, SC

Topsoil is much more than just dirt - it enhances just about every other aspect of your landscaping project. If you're looking for long-lasting, beautiful landscaping, it all starts with high-quality topsoil that is sourced for Charleston's climate.

Topsoil can be used in many ways to improve the overall quality and health of your lawn or garden. Generally, topsoil consists of the top layer of dirt that is found in the first 5 to 6 inches inside the ground. Topsoil, especially the organic variety, is mineral-dense, nutrient-dense, and chock-full of organic matter. That makes it a top choice by amateur and professional landscapers alike.

The best quality topsoil for gardening and growing plants isn't found in bags - it's found right here at Mr. Topsoil. We optimize our topsoils to give customers a well-balanced mix of pH levels, nitrogen levels, and the perfect mineral content. Unlike some competitors, our topsoils are formulated with the correct chemical composition needed for South Carolina's climate and native plant life. That means longer-lasting beauty, less maintenance, less back-breaking labor, and more cost savings for you and your family.

Perhaps the most essential tool at your disposal is topsoil. Topsoil can be used in a variety of ways to improve the overall health and quality of your garden and lawn. Whether you're a rookie gardener or a landscaping connoisseur, there's never a bad time to learn about topsoil uses and how topsoil can play a role in your outdoor space.

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Common Uses for Topsoil in Charleston

When it comes to essential tools in your garden, you might think a spade or sprinkler system would top the list. You wouldn't necessarily be wrong, but few folks think of topsoil as a crucial tool for gardening and landscaping. Topsoil is used in many different ways, but its main goal is to improve your lawn or garden's health and ability to grow.

So, what are some common reasons why you might need topsoil?
1.

Keep Plants & Gardens Healthy

Flowers and plants must draw nutrients from the soil they live in to survive. These nutrients must often be replenished, and one of the best ways to do so is by adding a fresh layer of topsoil. Of course, not all topsoils are the same. You'll want to choose topsoil meant for your needs and your location. For instance, topsoil meant to help fresh veggies grow near the coast may differ from topsoil needed to reduce inland soil erosion. To find the best topsoil for your residential or commercial project, be sure to contact Mr. Topsoil - our team is ready and waiting to help answer your questions!

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2.

Improve Drainage

If rainfall causes puddles to form in your garden or grass, you might need to apply a new layer of topsoil. When soil is densely packed, drainage issues abound because water isn't able to seep into the soil. You can remedy this issue by adding a sandy layer of topsoil to areas where water is pooling. By tilling the new and old topsoil together, you will break up compacted dirt, improve circulation, and ultimately help drainage issues around your plant's roots.

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3.

Refresh Your Garden's Curb Appeal

Weeding, mowing, and planting new flowers are great for refreshing the look of your garden, but adding fresh topsoil helps complete the look. This is especially true after a long winter. Cold weather can strip the nutrients from your topsoil, leaving it dull and ineffective. Adding a new layer of topsoil instantly enhances how your garden looks!

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Quality Mulch. Gorgeous Landscaping. Unbeatable Service

At Mr. Topsoil, we proudly provide premium mulch, available for homeowners and commercial businesses. With several colors and varieties to choose from, you won't have to worry about searching high and low for your one-stop mulch shop. Our mulch helps reduce weed development, retains ground moisture, moderates your soil temperatures, and even helps stop soil erosion.

Looking to keep your garden or lawn in tip-top shape all year long? Mr. Topsoil's bulk mulch products are perfect for what you need, whether you own a home or work as a property manager and need to maintain your tenant's lawns. By buying in bulk, you get the benefit of mulch delivery straight to your front door at the lowest costs around. As your top mulch supplier in Charleston, SC, you can rest easy knowing our team loves to help our customers find the best ways to improve their landscaping. While it's true that you can buy bagged mulch at your local hardware store, these products are typically packaged weeks, months, and even years ahead of time. In many cases, these bags are stored outdoors where the mulch absorbs rainwater, chemicals, and nasty contaminates. As if that weren't bad enough, this kind of mulch is very expensive, making the price of a large residential or commercial landscaping project unrealistic.

At Mr. Topsoil, our mulch is produced from local trees and is made fresh and available immediately to our customers. With affordable rates and flexible delivery options, choosing Mr. Topsoil for your mulch delivery in Charleston makes all the sense in the world.

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Benefits of Adding Mulch to Your Home or Business in Charleston

Gardens and other landscaped areas come in many sizes, shapes, and styles. Flower gardens add that extra special something to your home or commercial property. Veggie gardens are great for cutting back on grocery bills and add their own aesthetic appeal. If it's green and it grows, chances are it can benefit from mulch.

There are many reasons to use mulch, including:

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Improve Soil Quality

Improve-Soil-Quality

As mulch breaks down and decomposes, it leaves micro-nutrients in your soil, which helps it stay fertile and great for growing. In addition, studies show that tree roots located below a layer of mulch have high counts of mycorrhiza, which help your trees live and thrive.

Conservation & Prevention

Conservation

If you have a garden, you know how important it is to keep your plants watered. When you add mulch to your garden, it actually helps conserve water, meaning you may not have to break out your watering or sprinklers as often. In addition, mulch helps prevent pesky weeds from springing up in your flower beds, gardens, and outdoor living areas.

Improve Landscaping

Conservation

Sure, mulch adds a unique ambiance and feel to your garden or landscaping, but mulch also fosters the presence of earthworms. These slithery creatures add nutrients to your soil and help its structure so that your plants and vegetables grow healthy and strong.

We Are #1 Topsoil Supplier In The Tri-County Area.

Weather you are near or far will deliver all your needs with affordable prices

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Superior Sod Supplier in Charleston, SC

Buying the right sod for your home or business in Charleston speaks volumes. Proper sod placement can turn a dingy, dilapidated outdoor space into a pristine place where you love to spend time with friends and family. At Mr. Topsoil, we source the highest quality sod products from local farms, providing our clients with fresh, durable, clean grass. Whether you're upgrading your lawn or giving your commercial property a facelift, we have premium sod and timely delivery options to cater to your needs.

Having been in business for more than 34 years, we know that most customers have an idea of the kind of sod they want but don't know what it's called. Other times, they know the name but don't know how to install the sod. As a full-service sod provider, we can help with those issues and much more. It would be our pleasure to travel to your home or business and help you decide which kind of sod is best for your lawn our gardening project. If you need help applying the sod, our team of professionals are ready and waiting on your call.

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Here are just a few ways we assist customers with their residential and commercial sod needs:
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Sod Delivery in Charleston

Mr. Topsoil's team has been delivering sod for years. Over that time, we have built an incredible amount of experience working with nurseries and landscapers. We source our sod from local farmers, so its quality is never in question. From home gardens and lawns to local golf courses and sports fields, there is no job too small or large that we can't handle.

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Sod Supplier in Charleston

As Charleston's top sod supplier, it's no surprise that we work with local farms to get the highest-quality sod available. Quality sod means great grass and happy customers, and that's what we're all about. Our team of helpful pros will make sure your sod is delivered promptly and without error. When it's all said and done, the only thing that matters to Mr. Topsoil is your satisfaction, which is why we're not afraid to deliver near or far to meet your needs.

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Yard Sod in Charleston

Our selection of residential and yard sod is the best in our region. Our customers demand all sorts of yard sod, and we're happy to accommodate them. From different hues and textures to high durability sods meant for heavily trafficked areas - we've got it all. Need a little assistance on how to properly prep your yard? Our friendly team are happy to give you tips, tricks, and best practices to ensure your project is completed correctly.

Ready to Get Started?

Whether you're looking for a topsoil supplier in Charleston, SC, who can deliver to your home or a sod supplier for your small business, Mr. Topsoil is here to serve you. Whether you're a landscape gardener or a weekend warrior, we've got everything you need in one place, at a price you can afford. Contact our office today for your free quote!

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Latest News in Charleston, SC

Scoppe: Has a number cruncher hit on the solution to Charleston’s school woes?

Don Kennedy has told us about growing up in Fairfield County, about his five kids and his educator wife who retired last year, about how he was planning to retire this year before the Charleston County School Board suddenly had other ideas. He’s talked about working as chief financial officer for the Charleston County School District early in this century, about taking the same job in Seattle and later returning to that position here, about what changed in the decade he was gone — or, actually, what didn’t.The ...

Don Kennedy has told us about growing up in Fairfield County, about his five kids and his educator wife who retired last year, about how he was planning to retire this year before the Charleston County School Board suddenly had other ideas. He’s talked about working as chief financial officer for the Charleston County School District early in this century, about taking the same job in Seattle and later returning to that position here, about what changed in the decade he was gone — or, actually, what didn’t.

The CFO-turned-superintendent slides four charts across the conference table. Each focuses on a different topic, but they all tell the same story: Charleston County students made steady progress from 2005 through 2012, but then their test scores dropped, and then they stabilized for white kids while they kept falling for African American and Hispanic kids. Even at their best, the scores for black and brown kids were never impressive.

Today, he says, the district is still failing “the exact same families, different generations, but the same families, the same neighborhoods, the same demographics that we were struggling with to improve education outcomes” when he was here the first time.

“We all know that the problem exists,” he continues. “What we don’t know is why we can’t resolve it. The three superintendents I’ve worked with were all capable people,” and school board members all have wanted what’s best for the kids. “So the question is why we here in Charleston as a community, as a school system can’t make progress. We know progress can be made. What we’re trying to do is probe the system to figure out why it is that we haven’t made progress.”

It’s our editorial staff’s first meeting with the superintendent whose title no longer includes “interim” but whose future with the district is far from certain, given that the current school board, which is about to evaporate, says it’s launching a nationwide search for a permanent superintendent.

Your guess is as good as mine as to how long Mr. Kennedy will remain in this role, but for now, he’s making plans like a permanent superintendent. And thanks to the board’s decision to force out Superintendent Gerrita Postlewait and the county legislative delegation’s 2020 decision to turn the board into county council, in the process eliminating at least two-thirds of the current members, Mr. Kennedy looks like the most permanent fixture in the district right now.

I’ve been disgusted with the district since it paid Dr. Postlewait half a million dollars to go away and tried to con us into believing she just decided to up and leave. The idea of replacing her with a number cruncher left me even more put off. But Mr. Kennedy’s passion is the opposite of what I expected. As are his plans.

Yes, we all know he’s set what everybody’s calling an “ambitious” goal to have all kids reading on grade level by fifth grade — two years later than state law requires. What’s exciting is how he’s going about it.

After consulting with then-Mississippi Education Superintendent Carey Wright — a nationally recognized reformer to whom then-House Speaker Jay Lucas turned when he was trying to revive the massive education reform package that imploded in the Senate — Mr. Kennedy devised a three-part strategy: Teach teachers how to teach reading, which astoundingly most weren’t taught in college. Train staff in an organizational fad called systems thinking. And, the one I love, work with disadvantaged kids before they ever get to school.

“Kids coming into kindergarten are not prepared to read, to do the work,” he says. “So what we are as a system requiring our elementary schools to do is to bring them up to grade level. But the principals are saying it’s close to impossible, and these data would suggest that there may be some truth to that, because they’re constantly trying to catch them up. So we have been told that we need to bring kids into kindergarten ready to learn.”

He’s not just planning to make plans about planning to do this, like I’m used to watching at the Statehouse. He met this past week with facilities staff to create new classroom space at schools where there’s a waiting list for pre-kindergarten programs — either by reclaiming unused space in school buildings or by hauling trailers onto the campus.

He’s working on a way — and this might be the toughest part — to convert parents who are reluctant to send their kids to early childhood programs or don’t even know such programs exist.

And he’s doing something most superintendents would never do, reaching out to private child care providers with a First Steps-style proposal: Let us help train your employees so you can do a better job preparing kids in your programs to graduate into our programs.

Some of these initiatives will be up and running this fall, with more coming online in January. Which is fast.

There’s no such thing as a silver bullet for education, but early childhood education is about as close as it gets. It is the most important thing our state — or any district — can do to close the learning gap; call it racial or income-based, it’s the same kids who start out behind and stay behind.

The problem of course is that pre-K doesn’t yield quick results: The 3-year-olds you enroll in January won’t show up on standardized test results until they’re 7 or 8. And given the short timespan this school board traditionally has allowed for miracle-delivery, that doesn’t leave much margin for error.

But we’re about to get a whole new school board. So who knows? Maybe the new single-member-district board members will be so fixated on the hyper-local concerns of their election districts that they won’t worry about how the entire county is doing, and they’ll give a superintendent time to work a plan. And don’t ever believe I can’t find a bright side in the most dismal situation.

Charleston law firm building sold for $1.72M; new owner plans broadcast studio, residences

Charleston’s Broad Street is steeped in history, with quaint shops, dining venues, charming inns and legal practices near the Four Corners of Law.Now, an attorney and former New York resident wants to add a new element to the mix.Josh Nass intends to transform the four-story office building he bought for ...

Charleston’s Broad Street is steeped in history, with quaint shops, dining venues, charming inns and legal practices near the Four Corners of Law.

Now, an attorney and former New York resident wants to add a new element to the mix.

Josh Nass intends to transform the four-story office building he bought for $1.72 million at 61 Broad St. into a broadcast studio hub where politicians can film interviews and make appearances.

The nearly century-old Steinberg Law Firm has occupied the 7,056-square-foot structure since 1927, and, for now, it’s staying put.

Nass plans to convert the upper floors into residential units and transform the back part of the bottom floor into a television studio where politicians can come for one-on-one interviews and film campaign pitches for broadcast networks. Ideas for the rest of the ground floor include an office space, conference room and bar or dessert shop. He hopes to create a rooftop deck space as well.

“We are going to make Broad Street the hub for broadcast media,” Nass said.

The studio conversion will be overseen by Jonathan Wachtel, former director of communications for Nikki Haley during her tenure as the United States ambassador to the United Nations. Wachtel also is a veteran television producer with two decades of experience.

Nass works in crisis communications and government relations. He focuses on helping politicians and others with “reputational issues.”

Nass called Charleston “an exceptionally vibrant city” with uptapped opportunities.

“It’s about tapping into a market that’s a bedrock of great traditions, great roots and great history,” he said. “The capital coming into this market from investors is incredible. The potential hasn’t been realized yet in Charleston.”

Nass said Steinberg will remain a tenant for at least the next eight months with the option to stay up to a year and a half.

The law firm plans to maintain a presence on the peninsula once it decides to move out of the Broad Street site, according to law partner David Pearlman.

For now, it’s concentrating efforts on the soon-to-start construction of a new larger office building in Goose Creek near Infinger Furniture. It will replace the existing practice nearby on Goose Creek Boulevard.

Steinberg also has an office on Grandview Drive in Summerville.

“The majority of our clients are now in the suburbs, and we want to make sure we are easily accessible,” Pearlman said.

The suburban sites offer plenty of parking, where the current Broad Street office does not.

2022 hurricane season: Time to prepare is now

September introduced the Atlantic’s first named tropical storm of 2022, and with the aftereffects of Hurricane Fiona, which devastated Puerto Rico and Turks and Caicos Islands with flooding and damaging winds, late summer is often a vivid reminder of the damage these storms can cause and the importance of preparation for communities on the South Carolina coast.“And the time to prepare is now,” said Bryan Wood, MUSC emergency manager, Department of Public Safety.Wood and members of MUSC’s Office of Studen...

September introduced the Atlantic’s first named tropical storm of 2022, and with the aftereffects of Hurricane Fiona, which devastated Puerto Rico and Turks and Caicos Islands with flooding and damaging winds, late summer is often a vivid reminder of the damage these storms can cause and the importance of preparation for communities on the South Carolina coast.

“And the time to prepare is now,” said Bryan Wood, MUSC emergency manager, Department of Public Safety.

Wood and members of MUSC’s Office of Student Engagement participated in an annual hurricane seminar for students on Aug. 24. The team reviewed preparation basics, including establishing a hurricane plan, preparing a hurricane kit, explaining the use of Code Red Alerts and providing information related to Lowcountry storm shelters and managing pets during a storm. At the event, the first 25 students received a ReadyAmerica Emergency Kit, which included enough food bars and water pouches to last three days, gloves, light sticks, a survival blanket, weather radio, flashlight and an emergency plan. The event was sponsored by the Center for Global Health, Office of Student Engagement and Department of Public Safety.

Wood emphasized that all individuals and families should make hurricane preparations every year.

In 2019, Hurricane Dorian brought high winds and rain to the Lowcountry and Carolina coast, leaving 270,000 households without power.

Wood recommends creating a hurricane kit with enough supplies for three days. Contents of the kit should include: · Water – 2 gallons of water per person per day, which includes 1 gallon for drinking and 1 gallon for general use. · Food – plan for a three-day supply per person, including high-protein, nonperishable items. · Flashlight/lanterns and batteries. · Weather radio and batteries. · First aid kit. · Toilet paper. · Miscellaneous entertainment in case of a loss of power: deck of cards, games, etc.

If a hurricane warning forecasts a threat that most likely will affect this area, Wood recommends elevating readiness and doing the following: · Fill prescription drugs. · Have cash on hand. · Fill cars with gas. · Prepare detailed video documentation of your home, inside and outside, including contents, using a smartphone

Wood recommends the resource Hurricanestrong.org, a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)- and NOAA-sponsored website, from which to download a family hurricane preparedness guide and the hurricane safety and preparedness checklists, when starting your preparation.

MUSC students and employees are encouraged to download and use MUSC Alerts – an emergency notification system through the MUSC Alert System that includes SMS text messaging, voice messaging and desktop alerts for up-to-date progress on storm progress, campus preparations and related announcements.

A valuable statewide hurricane resource is the South Carolina Emergency Management Division’s S.C. Emergency Manager Mobile app, which is downloadable via the Apple App Store and Google Play. It helps users to build an emergency plan and provides Zone evacuation updates, closings and delays in addition to emergency shelter locations and other resources.

“These are all practical tips and activities that anyone can do now, or anytime, to ensure they’re ready for hurricane season,” Wood said.

North Charleston preparing former dairy plant for possible commercial use

NORTH CHARLESTON — Months after a milk processing plant ceased production, the city is preparing the former Borden Dairy site for potential commercial use.North Charleston City Council voted Sept. 22 to rezone the old plant at 5001 LaCross Road that closed in May from light industrial to commercial redevelopment.The city said it is not aware of specific plans for the property, but acknowledged the goal is bring the lot and other adjacent properties in alignment with the city’s vision for the area as a commercial red...

NORTH CHARLESTON — Months after a milk processing plant ceased production, the city is preparing the former Borden Dairy site for potential commercial use.

North Charleston City Council voted Sept. 22 to rezone the old plant at 5001 LaCross Road that closed in May from light industrial to commercial redevelopment.

The city said it is not aware of specific plans for the property, but acknowledged the goal is bring the lot and other adjacent properties in alignment with the city’s vision for the area as a commercial redevelopment district that will be located a short distance from the incoming Lowcountry Rapid Transit line.

The LCRT route, which will run a bus from Ladson to downtown Charleston along U.S. Highway 52, is expected to attract commercial and residential development along the corridor, particularly around the transit stations.

“The rezonings take into account the totality of development in the general area, including LCRT, which we believe is more conducive to commercial redevelopment,” said city spokesman Ryan Johnson.

The city is no stranger to repurposing industrial properties. But much of that activity has been concentrated on and near the former Charleston naval base, where former military buildings continue to be redeveloped to house new businesses and nonprofits.

Now, North Charleston’s focus is near City Hall, where a number of industrial lots along LaCross Road are being prepared for potential commercial use, including the well-known milk processing facility.

Four other properties along the road are also being rezoned, including 4990 LaCross Road, which contains a parking lot and undeveloped land, and 5100 LaCross Road, which includes forested area and cell tower.

“We intend to pursue more staff-initiated rezonings across the city to bring parcels and areas in line with the future land use map as dictated by the Comprehensive Plan,” said Deputy Planning Director Megan Clark.

The LaCross Road site became Borden’s when the milk company acquired the operations of locally based Coburg Dairy in 2011. Coburg, founded by a local farmer in 1920 off Savannah Highway, relocated to the North Charleston plant in the late 1980s.

But over the years, Borden Dairy, which informed employees in April that the company would be closing the plant in May, has become a bit out of character with the neighborhood.

Nearby is the MUSC Children’s Health R. Keith Summey Medical Pavilion, North Charleston City Hall and the newly constructed apartment complex beside it, and the Tanger Outlets.

Incoming to the area is the multimillion-dollar Uptown project, which includes a Topgolf entertainment venue, two parking garages, a coffee shop, several restaurants and office space, a 300-unit apartment building and two hotels.

There’s also speculation about whether a large Charleston-based hospital will soon call LaCross Road home.

The old Borden site is almost directly behind two parcels recently purchased by Roper Hospital, which announced last year its plans to relocate its downtown Charleston medical facility. The hospital bought two lots off LaCross Road for $13 million a piece, sparking discussion about where Roper will build its new health center.

Roper has not announced where its new health center will be located. The city of North Charleston did affirm that it has been in conversation with Roper about potentially relocating to the city.

“Soon, Roper St. Francis Healthcare will announce a new, more central location of Roper Hospital, a beacon of clinical excellence and service to the Lowcountry for the past 166 years,” said spokesman Andy Lyons.

Explore Charleston CEO says no ill-intent with Cayman Bank Account

Charleston’s state-funded tourism marketing group stowed nearly $2 million in public money in an offshore account on an island nation known for banking secrecy long favored by tax dodgers and money launderers.Helen Hill, chief executive of the Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau also known as Explore Charleston, said she could understand that this might provoke so...

Charleston’s state-funded tourism marketing group stowed nearly $2 million in public money in an offshore account on an island nation known for banking secrecy long favored by tax dodgers and money launderers.

Helen Hill, chief executive of the Charleston Area Convention & Visitors Bureau also known as Explore Charleston, said she could understand that this might provoke some suspicion, but the account was used strictly for business and the public’s good.

“It just sounds shady to say you have an account in the Cayman Islands,” she said.

The account, Hill said, was set up solely to make good on the bureau’s deal with British Airways that brought Charleston its first nonstop transatlantic flight. At the time, this route was expected to have an estimated $20.2 million annual economic impact.

On Oct. 17, 2018, the CVB entered into an agreement with British Airways that required the nonprofit to hand over $4 million each year for the airline’s two operating seasons. The money would help underwrite the Charleston to London flights and joint marketing efforts for the venture.

These types of air incentives by conventions and visitor bureaus are quite common in the U.S., according to a 2020 study by Russell Mills, the senior director of regional development at Bowling Green State University.

The ability to design incentives may make community organizations, such as Explore Charleston, popular options when negotiating with airlines, the study found.

Charleston County and the state Department of Commerce put up $1.8 million to help satisfy the agreement.

The contract called for the visitors bureau, more commonly known as Explore Charleston, to pay the airline in British pound sterling, the official currency of the United Kingdom.

Hill said she decided to keep the money in pounds sterling in an account in the Cayman Islands. That way the money would hold its value and not be subject to fluctuating exchange rates.

If kept in U.S. currency, Explore Charleston might have had to come up with more money if the dollar lost value to the pound, Hill said.

In total, Explore Charleston paid British Airways more than $1.7 million as part of this arrangement, according to audits. The visitors bureau received a refund of $251,992 after the COVID-19 pandemic paused air travel in 2020.

In August 2020, Explore Charleston closed its Cayman Islands account with Wells Fargo and moved the remaining funds to First National Bank, Chris Campbell, a spokesman for the nonprofit. First National Bank holds the British pound sterling notes in Commerz Banks, headquartered in Germany.

Campbell said the account currently holds $766,158 for the purpose of advertising and marketing in the United Kingdom.

In 2019, when the service began, British Airways had about 9,300 passengers fly back and forth from London to Charleston. Each way during its twice-weekly flights, the planes ran about 73 percent full. The service ended abruptly in March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

British Airways has yet to resume direct flights to Charleston. Hill said she’s unsure if the airline will make a return.

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